Teach In about Title IX and the History of Anti-Rape Culture Activism at Harvard

Teach In about Title IX and the History of Anti-Rape Culture Activism at Harvard

There is a lot of energy on campus right now to take action, following a survivor’s account of university indifference and retaliation. Let’s begin to direct our energy to impactful action by first learning about Title IX and the history of student activism against rape culture at Harvard. Join us next Wednesday at 4pm in Boylston 103! RSVP here: https://www.facebook.com/events/561184383996105/

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Survivors Are Not a Liability: our demands

Survivors Are Not a Liability: our demands

1. Standardize the informal process through which survivors can seek academic, residential, and extracurricular accommodations 

2. Ad Board must adhere to Title IX standards in order to provide an expedient decision-making process for survivors.

3. University employees, including faculty, residential staff, and administrators, must undergo thorough training about Title IX.  


A first hand account of sexual assault at Harvard

A first hand account of sexual assault at Harvard

Harvard, how long will you wait out for survivors to graduate or get exhausted instead of being accountable to your students and Title IX standards?


Do you KNOW YOUR IX?


Nine Things to Know About Your Title IX Rights

Nine Things to Know About Your Title IX Rights


[ThinkProgress] Thanks To The Government Shutdown, College Sexual Assault Investigations Have Been Put On Hold

[ThinkProgress] Thanks To The Government Shutdown, College Sexual Assault Investigations Have Been Put On Hold

“On a practical level, that means that government officials aren’t in contact with the students who filed formal complaints against their universities. If complainants attempt to reach out to the investigator who’s handling their case, they’re told that person isn’t currently working. And Department of Education employees are also unable to conduct any follow-up reviews for the colleges whose cases have recently been settled. Officials have been forced to cancel site visits to campuses, which are intended to make sure they’re adhering to the terms of the settlement agreement.
[…]
It’s not the only way that the current shutdown is having an impact on survivors of domestic violence. Rape crisis centers across the country stopped receiving federal funds on Friday, since the government is no longer able to distribute the funding that’s appropriated under the Violence Against Women Act. And that’s on top of the deep cuts that domestic violence programs already faced under sequestration.”

[Crimson] A Job Well Done, More To Do

http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2013/10/4/osl-rankin-director/

“It is also our hope that the new director focus intensely on advocating for sexual assault policy change. Our Harvard Can Do Better a student campaign for sexual assault policy reform received overwhelming support for its policy demands in a student referendum last year. Among those demands are a policy of affirmative consent, clarifying the meaning of mental incapacitation, and offering comprehensive and inclusive sexual assault prevention and response training every year. The group also calls for more transparency in the administration and for clearer language that includes the LGBTQ-identifying community. These commonsense reforms have been implemented at a number of peer colleges, and they will go a long way toward creating safe social environments.

A standard of affirmative consent in particular is a change that would be critical in helping students to have more power in prosecuting assailants and in creating cultural change on campus. Despite the successes of the Our Harvard Can Do Better campaign, students have thus far lacked a strong ally in OSAPR who is willing to push for their demands. We hope that OSAPR’s new director can become that ally, and that he or she does not shy away from advocating for reform to administrators.

We salute the outstanding work that Sarah Rankin has accomplished in her seven years as OSAPR director. With a greater focus on policy reform, OSAPR can become an even stronger ally for sexual assault survivors and students working to effect change.”